• Worries as data shows staff leaving nursing sector

    Analysis by thinktank Health Foundation has revealed that record numbers of NHS staff are quitting the sector.

    The research found that between June 2017 and 2018, over 10,000 NHS staff blamed poor work/life balance for them leaving the sector, an increase from 3,689 during 2010-2011.

    The results, based on NHS Digital data, found that the nursing profession was the most affected, with the number rising from 1,069 to 2,910 over a seven-year period.

    Discussing the findings, Anita Charlesworth, director of research and economics at the Health Foundation, said: “Retaining NHS staff is vital if the health service is to address the chronic workforce shortages. 

    “Funding constraints and growing staff shortages have continued to pile more pressure on those working in the health service, squeezing as much as possible out of a workforce that is clearly feeling the strain. 

    “With a gap of over 100,000 staff across the NHS, so much now hinges on the forthcoming workforce implementation plan.”

    Charlesworth added: “Unless these shortages are reduced, the NHS risks being locked in a damaging and vicious circle of staff shortages, adding pressure on existing NHS staff and in turn, leading them to walk away from the service.”

    The figures come off the back of one of the worst recruitment periods ever for the NHS, with statistics revealing that some parts of the UK are hiring only one nurse for every 400 jobs advertised. 

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    Stuart O'Brien

    All stories by: Stuart O'Brien

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